.Net Core Hello World Console App (in Ubuntu 16.04)

Because every new framework needs another “Hello World!”

I’ve been forcing myself to try and learn this new .Net Core and in the past I’ve wrote about writing C# code on Windows and running it in Linux using the Mono framework and recently I wrote about using .Net Core with Yeoman to start an MVC application.

This however is a much simpler example to start understanding the .Net Core framework.

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Plex Tip #2 – How to change your Plex database path in Ubuntu 16.04

In here I intend to simply explain how to change the Plex database path in Ubuntu.

For a bit of background my Plex database is over 130GB in size (last I checked) and my boot drive is 80GB while my media drives are 3TB. Naturally storing the Plex database on the media drives (that get backed up to each other too) makes sense.

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How To: Compile C# App in Visual Studio for Linux

For those who don’t know C# is a Microsoft language and Visual Studio is a Microsoft IDE or Integrated Development Environment.

Due to Microsoft’s history of being a very proprietary closed-source company there’s a bit of a perception that you wouldn’t be able to compile Applications written in C# and run them in the Open Source world of Linux but I’m going to show you just how easy this has become with a very basic hello world example.

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Hardware Video Encoding progess with the Raspberry Pi

raspberryPi640_broadcom_webH_264_logo

***Scroll to bottom of article to see updated code with audio & video trancoding.*** 

The Raspberry Pi is not bad at hardware H264 encoding. It processed a 5.81GB 720P 60fps Mpeg Transport Stream that was an 1hr, 2min, 27seconds long and converted to H264 1280 x 720 60fps in 1hr, 38min, 57seconds with a resulting file size of 293MB.

The quality is a bit less than I’m used to with Handbrake and this is video only (still need to find out how to add audio to gstreamer transcoding). However for the quality it’s at it is an impressive speed for something the size of a credit card that consumes 5V1A of power and costs only $35.

Here’s how I was able to get the Raspberry Pi to get this far.

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